How to Revive a Dying Air Plant


How to revive a dying air plant

The reason for a dying air plant is usually because of rot due to water collecting in the crown of the plant. Air plants need to dry out between each watering. If excess water collects in the crown of the air plant without draining properly, this cause the leaves to turn brown or yellow and feel soft with a dying appearance.

Air plants turn brown at the ends of the leaf and start curling, if they are not being watered often enough.

Air plants can scorch a brown/yellow color if they are in too much direct sunlight.

An air plant starts dying if it is living in conditions that are contrary to the conditions of their natural environment.

To revive a dying air plant it is important to recreate the conditions of their natural environment with bright indirect light, water at least twice per week but allow the air plant to dry before watering again and ensuring a temperature range of between 65℉ and 85℉.

Keep reading to understand why your air plant is dying and how to implement the solutions to revive your drying air plant (Tillandsia)…

Air Plant Turning Brown on the Ends

  • Symptoms. Air plant leaves turn brown, dry and curling at the ends of the leaves
  • Causes. Low humidity, underwatering, possibly too much sun and heat.

The reason for air plants to turn brown at the ends is usually underwatering. The leaves turn brown at the ends and start curling due to drought stress. Air plants require a generous watering as often as 2 times per week with the plant fully submerged in lukewarm water to prevent the leaf ends turning brown.

Underwatering is by far the most significant reason for air plants leaf ends turning brown and perhaps curling up, but low humidity, too much sun and excessive heat can also be factors.

Air plants prefer a day time temperature of between 65 and 85℉ and between 50-65℉.

If the temperature is significantly hotter, then this increases the rate of water loss from the leaves and the air plants demand for water which can result in the leaf ends turning brown.

Air plants can grow in some direct sunlight, but prefer to stay out of the sun during the afternoon in Summer as the intense sunlight can also contribute to the air plant losing too much moisture, which also contributes to the leaves turning brown at the ends and curling.

There are approximately 650 species of air plants (Tillandsia) and to establish the reason for your air plant turning brown at the ends it is important to understand where your variety of air plant originates.

Air plants are native to hot, dry desert like climates, yet also grow in rainforests. Where your air plant is from affects how often you should water your plant.

Air plants with darker green leaves on the left is adapted to a rainforest environment whereas the air plant with the silvery green leaves on the right is adapted to a dry climate.
Air plants with darker green leaves on the left is adapted to a rainforest environment whereas the air plant with the silvery green leaves on the right is adapted to a dry climate.

The easiest way to establish where your air plant is native to hot, dry climate or rainforest is by the leaves:

  • Silvery green leaves that look more flattened and often have a fuzzy texture to the leaves, originate from dry areas and require less watering, whereas…
  • Dark green leaves that are less scaly and more curved are from rainforests and require watering more frequently as well as misting every few days.

It is important to note that both types of air plants leaves can turn brown at the ends due to underwatering, but brown leaf ends are far more common in air plants that are native to tropical, rainforest conditions.

If you are watering your air plants less then once a week, this is the reason for the leaves turning brown at the ends.

How to Revive an Air Plant with Brown Leaf Ends

To revive air plants with brown leaf ends, give them a good soak in lukewarm water to allow the leaves to absorb all the water they require and move the air plant to a cooler area, that is protected from direct sunlight to allow the air plant to recover.

  • Submerge your air plant in a basin of water for 10 minutes to help restore the brown leaves. Air plants absorb water through their leaves rather then roots. Submerging the air plant gives the leaves the opportunity to uptake the water they require to alleviate drought stress and revive the brown ends.
  • Ensure that the water is lukewarm to avoid shock and ideally leave the water overnight to allow chlorine and fluoride to evaporate from the water which can contribute to the leaf ends turning brown on some, more sensitive varties of air plants.
  • Water your air plant at least twice per week to avoid brown leaf ends. The optimal watering frequency depends on whether the variety of air plant originated from a rainforest environment (dark green leaves) or a arid environment (silvery, green leaves) but regardless of the origin, if the leaves are turning brown at the tips and curling, you should water them more often. Typically it is recommended to water air plants with dark green leaves up to 4 times per week, whereas air plants with silvery green leaves should be watered around twice per week, although this is generic advice and you watering should be adjusted for your climate and conditions.
  • Suspend your air plant upside down for a few minutes after watering. Whilst air plants require relatively frequent watering, they are also susceptible to rot is water pools in the crown of the plant. Place the air plant in a location with some air flow to ensure the air plant can dry between bouts of watering to ensure the optimal balance of moisture.
  • Ensure the air plant is in a room with a temperature range of 65 and 85℉ during the day and 50-65℉ at night. This is the right temperature range for all varieties of air plant. Consider whether sources of indoor heating are drying out your air plant and move it to a cooler location to help the brown ends recover.
  • Move air plants out of direct sunlight in the afternoons during the Summer months. Generally speaking the dark green leafed varieties of air plants prefer bright indirect light or perhaps some filtered light and the silvery, green varieties can tolerate more sun. Intense sunlight in the Summer is too much for most air plants so ideally find a location with bright, indirect light or morning sun followed by afternoon shade.
  • Increase the humidity for dark green varieties of air plants by placing them in a bathroom or misting every few days. Misting the air plant creates a humid micro-climate that emulates the higher humidity conditions of its native tropical rainforest. Just ensure that the water does not collect at the crown of the leaves as this can cause rot.

Should I Cut the Brown Leaf Tips off Air Plants?

You can cut off any brown, dried up leaf tips of air plants with a pair or pruners or scissors, if the leaf tip has gone brown and crispy. This helps to restore the appearance of the air plant and stimulate the growth of healthy green leaf tips.

An air plant with brown leaf tips should revive once it has been watered thoroughly, shaded from intense sunlight and kept at a temperature of 65 and 85℉ to help emulate the conditions of its native environment.

Air Plant Turning Brown, Yellow or Black (Due to Rot)

  • Symptoms. Areas of the air plant can turn brown or black and feel soft, usually around the crown of the plant.
  • Causes. Water pooling at the crown of the plant in the leaves as a result of not allowing the air plant to dry between each bout of watering, not draining the air plant after watering, poor air circulation and cold temperatures.

The reason for air plants turning brown is because of rot, caused by water pooling in the leaves at the crown of the plant and cold temperatures. Air plants need to be suspended upside down and allowed to dry out between bouts of watering to prevent excess moisture causing the plant to turn brown and rot.

As air plants attach to trees and rocks in their native environment, they are used to well draining conditions and they do not tolerate water standing in their structure usually at the crown of the plant.

Rot is generally avoided in their native environment as they usually grow at an angle (whilst attached to a tree branch) that allows water to drain away from the plant in between rainfall.

The leaves may turn brown, yellow or black with a soft texture. Generally it is water that is trapped in the plant after watering that causes rot but it can also be:

  • Excessive misting causing water to pool at the crown of the plant.
  • Not allowing the air plant to dry between each bout of watering.
  • Not suspending your air plant upside down after watering (to allow the water to drain properly)
  • A lack of air circulation, which helps to dry the leaves after watering.
  • Temperatures colder 50℉ at night and cooler then 65℉ during the day contributes to rot.

Air plants typically do not like to be on windows sills at night as they can often be too cold in the Winter for the Air plant to tolerate.

Also the leaves may be in contact with the glass of the window which can be considerable colder then the ambient temperature in the room.

How to Revive Air Plants Turning Brown

Air plants that are turning brown and dying due to rot are very difficult to save as the rot spreads through the plant. It is sometimes possible to cut away any rotting parts of the plant with a sharp pair of pruners (if the brown rotting area is relatively localized).

Wipe the blades of your pruners with a cloth soaked in disinfectant between each cut to prevent potentially spreading fungal pathogens from diseased parts of the plant to otherwise health growth then adhere to the best practices of care:

  • Always allow your air plant to dry before watering again. This means suspending the air plant upside down for at least 20 minutes, to ensure an excess water has drained away from the crown of the plant, where water most often gets trapped and causes rot.
  • Ensure good air circulation to ensure the air plant dries between each watering. As air plants are adapted to growing in exposed areas or high in trees, they prefer some air circulation which helps them to dry to avoid rot. Air plants like an open to be located near an open window rather then a stuffy room and can tolerate air currents from air conditioning in the Summer which can help avoid rot.
  • Suspend your air plant upside down after watering to prevent brown rot. Air plants grow well if they are submerged in water then allowed to dry for at least 30 minutes, angled upside down to encourage water to run off the plant rather then collect in the leaves at the crown of the air plant.
  • Ensure your air plant is in a room where the temperature does not drop below 50℉ at night. The optimal temperature range is 65℉ to 85℉ during the day and 50℉ to 65℉ at night. Cold temperatures slow down evaporation from the leaves and frost can cause the air plants to rot and turn black and soft.

Typically it is recommended to water air plants that originate from dry, desert twice per week by running them under the tap and to water air plants from rainforest regions 4 times a weeks for the optimal balance of watering.

Watering with this soak and dry style of watering provides enough water to prevent the air plant leaf tips from turning brown due to drought and prevents the air plant from developing rot from overwatering.

Specifically how often you water your air plant can depend on the climate and the level of sun exposure but I must emphasize it is important the air plant feels completely dry before you water it again, rather then staying consistently moist as it is much easier to revive an air plant that is underwatered (with brown leaf tips) then an air plant that is dying of rot.

Air Plant Turning Brown or Yellow (Excess Sun Exposure)

  • Symptoms. Air plants scorch brown or yellow.
  • Causes. Excessive sun exposure, with high temperature and low humidity as contributing factors.

The reason for air plants turning brown or yellow is often because too much direct sunlight in the Summer causing the air plant to turn a scorched brown. Air plants do require bright light and often prefer sunlight but intense Summer sun combined with high temperatures causes air plants to turn brown.

The most common varieties of air plants originate from either rainforest environments (which typically have dark green leaves) or dry, desert like environments (which have silvery, green leaves).

If the air plant naturally has dark green leaves, they tend to be more susceptible to scorching to a brown or yellow color in the Summer, particularly if they are in intense direct sunlight in the Summer months.

However all varieties of air plant can scorch to a brown or yellow color if they are moved from a more shaded location, to a location with intense direct sunlight, without time to acclimatize.

The air plant is more likely to turn brown in the sun if the temperature exceeds 85℉ and the climate is particularly dry.

How to Revive a Air Plant Turning Brown or Yellow due to Excess Sun Exposure

  • Move the air plant to an area with afternoon shade. If the air plant has naturally dark green leaves then it is more accustomed to having protection from direct light so locate air plants in bright, indirect sunlight. Silvery, green leafed varieties of air plants prefer bright, indirect light or morning sun followed by afternoon shade. The key is to avoid the intense afternoon sun in Summer to avoid further bleaching the air plant’s leaves.
  • Move your air plant to a room with higher humidity. South facing window sill are often too hot, too bright and to low in humidity for air plants, particularly if the air plant has dark green leaves. Move the air plant to a bathroom which has higher humidity or mist the air plant lightly to recreate a humid micro-climate to which dark green air plants are adapted. Silvery green leafed air plants typically do not need misting.
  • Give your air plants a generous watering. Often air plants require a good watering if they have turned brown from sun scorch as the sun, low humidity and high temperatures can dry the air plant out. Place it in a basin of water for 10 minutes or so for the leaves to uptake the water the require.
  • Ensure the temperature of the room does not exceed 85℉. Consider the micro-climate of the room when locating your air plant. Window sills are most often too hot in Summer, so find a cooler area, that still has bright light, whilst the air plant is recovering.

These steps should help to prevent any further damage to your air plant and once you have corrected its environment so that it is more favorable, the air plant should begin to recover.

Some scorched leaves may fall off due to the damage, however this does not necessarily mean the plant is dying. Keep your air plant in the right conditions and new growth should appear if some of the leaves fall off.

Typically the individual leaves that are scorched brown do not recover their appearance but they do not harm the plant and you can prune any damaged leaves off with a sharp pair of pruners which can stimulate new growth.

Key Takeaways:

  • The reason for a dying air plant is because of rot caused by water pooling in the crown of the plant. Air plants need to be dry between bouts of watering. If water stays in the crown of the air plant it turns brown and starts to rot with a dying appearance.
  • The reason for an air plant turning brown at the ends is because of underwatering. Air plants should be watered twice a week with a good soak. If the air plant is underwatered the leaf ends start to turn brown and curl up because of drought.
  • Air plants can turn brown or yellow and feel soft if they are consistently damp. Air plants require good air circulation and need to dry out between bouts of watering. If the air plants is damp for too long it develops rot, causing the leaves to turn brown or yellow with a dying appearance.
  • Air plants can scorch brown if they are in too much direct sunlight with temperatures exceeding 85℉ and in climates with low humidity. Air plants prefer bright indirect light rather then full sun which causes the leaves to turn brown.
  • To revive an air plant with curling brown leaf ends, submerge the air plant in lukewarm water for 10 minutes to allow the leaves to absorb the water they need. Keep the air plant out of direct sunlight to help the brown leaf ends to recover and water the air plant at least twice per week.
  • To revive a dying air plant, recreate the air plants natural environment with bright, indirect light, water the air plant at least twice per week and allow the air plant to dry before watering again. Keep air plants in a temperature range between 65℉ and 85 during the day and 50 to 65 at night.

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